Vitam vas!
    Nazdar! a vítat až k Únor Má KuchynŘ Má Svět. My ar být na návštěvě Czechosolovia

And in case you don’t speak Czech:

The Czech Republic was my choice for this month. I live in Kolin, a community that was originally settled by Czechs in the early 1900s. Our home is one of the original homesteads in the area and is actually listed as a Louisiana Cultural Heritage Property.


The original owners – Francis and Christine Welchech – built a good sized chicken house first. This is where they lived while they built the small barn,


and the large barn in 1917. {For many years when the community was young dances and gatherings were held on the top floor of this barn.


and finally the house in 1926 (top picture).

If you notice the high sloping roof on the barn it is because where the people originally lived and migrated to (Kansas) had lots of snow and the snow would easily slide off the tall gabled roof. {Just a wee bit of history}.

Every year there are two festivals in Kolin. In the fall there is the Kolache Festival. In March there is the Czech Festival. The fall festival is simple and is mainly based on the sale of kolaches. The larger festival in March is filled with dancing, history, pictorals, tours of the area, and lots of hearty food. Pork. Cabbage – usually in the form of sauerkraut – and, of course, KOLACHES (Koláče). It was these bakery treats that pushed me to choose Czechoslovakia for this months MKMW visit.

KOLACHES (Koláče). is not really just a single sweet treat, it is a generic term for baked pastries. But in the US it refers to a yeast bread with a pocket of sweet filling – Poppy Seed, Cream Cheese, Apple. There is a nice definition HERE!

I have a good basic sweet dough recipe I used for King Cake so I adapted it for the bread machine and used it to make the Kolache.

    1 cup milk (at room temperature)
    1 tsp. flavor (lemon, orange, vanilla, or butter)
    4 1/2 tsp active dry yeast
    1/3 cup granulated sugar
    1 tsp. salt
    1/2 cup all-purpose shortening
    2 large eggs, beaten
    4 cups all-purpose flour

Mix the milk, flavoring, and yeast in the bread machine container. Let sit for about 5 minutes until foamy.
Mix the eggs, sugar, and shortening in a small bowl. Then add to yeast/milk mix.
Add flour.
Use the dough cycle to mix/raise/punch the dough. When done remove dough to a lightly floured surface.
Divide the dough into 12 – 15 equal sized pieces and roll into balls. Press each ball into a fairly flat disc. Let rise until about doubled in size.
Make deep indentations in each disc using your fingers. The indentation must be deep and strong or the dough will pop back up when baking.


Fill with whatever filling you are using. I prefer the apple, cream cheese, or cinnamon crumble.} Gently brush the dough with melted butter.
Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Bake for 12-15 minutes.

Cream Cheese Filling:

    8 oz cream cheese, softened (230 grams)
    1 egg yolk
    1/4 cup sugar (50 grams)
    1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Mix all ingredients thoroughly. Use a heaping tablespoon for each kolache
Popsika: (Crumble Topping)

    1/2 Cup Sugar
    1/4 Cup flour
    1 Teaspoon cinnamon
    2 Tablespoons of melted butter

Mix together with fingers or a fork until well mixed and crumbly. Use a heaping tablespoon for each kolache.

With lots of practice my Kolaches looked like they were supposed to.


We are honorary Czechs because our barns have been used for tours and we participated in the festivals for many years. Sadly there are only a few of the original community members left, but with the festivals successive generations learn about and keep the culture going.

Check the My Kitchen My World blog for a round-up of the Czech recipes in early March.