corn


Brunswick Stew supposedly originated in either Virginia or Georgia.  And according to one food historian – Germany.  Wherever it came from really doesn’t matter.  What matter is how it tastes.

It is basically a thick tomato based veggie stew.  It is full of different veggies – lima or butter beans, corn, okra, and anything else you can find.  Sometimes potatoes, sometimes not.  Possum, squirrel, or rabbit.  But these days it is usually chicken.  Which is what I used in this one from the Low-Fat, low-Cholesterol Cookbook.

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Since this is basically a VEGGIE stew it is already low fat, low cholesterol.  What makes it even more healthy is NOT using butter, brisket, pork, BBQ sauce (in some), and salt free tomato paste and Worcestershire sauce.

    veggie oil spray
    1 tsp olive oil
    1 medium onion, chopped
    1 lb boneless, skinless chicken breasts with all visible fat removed
    1 1/2 cups frozen or fresh lima beans
    2 cups fresh or frozen corn
    5 cups fat free, low sodium chicken broth
    1 1/2 cups chopped tomatoes
    6-oz can not salt added tomato paste
    3 Tble lemon juice
    1 Tbl low sodium Worcestershire sauce.

Heat a large pot over medium-high heat.  Remove from heat and spray the pot with veggie oil.  Then swirl the oil in the bottom of the pot.  Add the chicken and brown slightly.  Add the onions and brown along with browning the chicken more.  Add in the remainder of the ingredients and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and  simmer for about 1 hour.

{The original recipe called for just throwing the raw chicken chunks into the pot and then adding the other ingredients.  This just didn’t seem right to me so I browned it some first.}

Since it it was a stew I served it over some Rice Flour Pasta.

We liked the taste of this.  The Worcestershire sauce added a little kick.  The next time I would add in the okra.  It would NOT add to the cholesterol or fat count.  And maybe a little garlic.  Ditto.

Original Recipe from Low-Fat, Low-Cholesterol Cooking from the American Heart Association.  Page 131.

I’m linking this post with Cookbook Countdown 13 hosted by Kitchen Flavours and Emily’s Cooking (Makan2).

 

It’s Potluck Week with I Heart Cooking Clubs. and the second to the last week to cook with Curtis Stone.  And I still have several recipes I really want to make…..

These muffins are made for Curtis by his Mum when he is home.  I can see why he likes them.  Full of bacon, corn, seasonings, and cheese.

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Slathered with butter they are perfect for breakfast.  They can be mixed and finished in about 30 minutes.

  • 12 ounces hardwood-smoked bacon, coarsely chopped {+ 1/3 cup bacon drippings}
  • 2 1/2 cups AP flour {I used 1/2 WWF and 1/2 AP Flour}
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 1/4 cups whole milk
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 cups grated white sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup fresh yellow corn kernels (from 1 cob)
  • 1/3 cup coarsely chopped fresh chives {I think they needed more.}

Fry the bacon  over medium heat until nice and crisp.  Reserve about 1/3 cup bacon drippings.

Mix together the flour, salt, pepper, and baking powder.  Mix together the egg, milk, bacon drippings, corn, chives, and 1 1/2 cups cheese.

Mix the milk mixture into the dry ingredients.  Pour equal amounts into each muffin cup which have been brushed with bacon drippings.

Sprinkle remaining cheese over the muffins.

Bake 18 minutes (mine took 15) or until golden brown.  Cool slightly then run a small knife around the the muffins and remove from the pan.  

Serve with warm butter.    {Recipe makes 12 muffins)   Similar Recipe here.

These were good. Definitely a repeat.

More Pot Luck at I Heart Cooking Clubs.

 

Behind the house we dug a pond.  Two actually.  One is full of catfish.  One is, supposedly, full of crawfish.  We have them just for fun.  Just so we can spend some lazy time fishing.  Just so we can have fresh fish when we want it.  Or crawfish.  The catfish are getting big.  When we stocked the pond two years ago they were fingerlings.  Now they are close to and some are over 2 pounds.  It is like fighting a 40 pound monster when they bite.

And they are delicious. Usually we fry them.  With fries.  With hushpuppies.  But we got tired of hushpuppies so I tried something new.

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Fritters filled with fresh corn and okra.

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MUCH better than plain hushpuppies.

I found them in the July/August 2014 issue of “Louisiana Cookin'” on page 55. But they are also on the magazine’s website.

I have had fun cooking so many recipes from this magazine.  Plenty more marked.  Most of the recipes from the past issues are on the Louisiana Cookin’ website. So, if yo want some GOOD Southern or Louisiana recipes this is the place to go.

I’m linking this post with Cookbook Countdown hosted by Kitchen Flavours and Emily’s Cooking (Makan2) Foray.

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This is my last recipe for March’s Cookbook Countdown. I managed to do seven!   Now all I have to do is figure out which cookbook to use for April!  So many cookbooks, so few years!!

Who says a salad has to be made with leafy greans? Or pasta? Why not try one with quinoa instead? Like this one from Ellie Krieger.

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Mixing some cooked quinoa with chicken sausage, corn, zucchini, and lots of spices is a great way to make salad. It is full of flavor, good ingredients, and, as always with Elie’s recipes, good for you.

I could have just eaten all the vegetables by themselves before adding the sausage and quinoa.  Doesn’t it look wonderful?

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I couldn’t find a salad I was really in the mood for my cookbooks so I went on line and this one caught my eye immediately.   After I made it I realized we had originally made a similar recipe in Ellie’s Weeknight Wonders  {Corn and Quinoa with Sausage}   but it wasn’t listed as a salad. It is basically the same ingredients but with different flavors (Cumin and parsley) and the zucchini thrown in. Bingo!!

One small change I made – the recipe called for adding the diced red pepper at the end.  I assumed she meant raw and I don’t like raw pepper so I threw the diced red pepper in with the onions to cook.   And I think next time I will add a little more cumin.

And it was great.  Definitely one to enjoy regularly.

You can find the recipe on Ellie’s website.  

Find out what Gaye made for her salad by clicking on over to Eating with Ellie.  I’m sure it will be good.

It’s MYSTERY BOX CHALLENGE week again with I Heart Cooking Clubs. I love a good challenge. Especially when I can meet the challenge.

This weeks mystery box contents:

    Salmon (fresh, smoked, canned),
    Green Peas (dried, fresh or frozen),
    Hazelnuts,
    Eggplant,
    Parmesan Cheese,

    Kale,
    Apples (Any color/kind),
    Blue Cheese,
    Bread Rolls/Buns, and
    Rosemary.

I managed to complete the challenge with three of the ingredients, weak, yes, but still…

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Gratin of Ziti and Vegetables

I love making dishes with the fruits of our garden and this one had it all – squash, tomatoes, eggplant, corn. I cannot think of a better way to use these all up.

    2 quarts water
    4 ounces ziti or penne
    3 tablespoons virgin olive oil
    1 onion (about 8 ounces), peeled and coarsely chopped
    4 ounces string beans, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (1 cup)
    1 small eggplant (about 8 ounces), cut into 1/2-inch pieces (2 1/22 cups)
    1 teaspoon herbes de Provence
    1 pattypan (or other type) squash (8 ounces), cut into 1/2-inch pieces (2 cups){ I used zucchini.}
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    2 ripe tomatoes (about 10 ounces),cut into 12-inch pieces (2 cups)
    2 ears sweet corn (about 1 pound), husked and kernels cut off (1 1/2 cups)
    1/2 cup black olive shavings, preferably from Nyons olives { I used kalamata.} (about 2 dozen olives)

CRUMB TOPPING

    l slice fine-textured white bread, processed into crumbs in a food processor (2/3 cup)
    1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    1 tablespoon virgin olive oil
    1/2 cup minced chives

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
Cook the sizi in boiling water with salt until al dente. Drain and briefly run ziti under cold water. Cover, and set aside.
Heat the oil in a large skillet then add the onion and beans.
Cover and cook over medium heat for about 2 minutes.
Add the eggplant and herbes de Provence. Cover and cook, over medium heat for another 8 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Then add the squash, salt, and pepper. Cover and cook 2 more minutes.
Remove the skillet from the heat. Mix in the tomatoes, corn, and olive.
Mix in the cooked pasta and pour the mixture into an 8-cup casserole dish.
In a small bowl mix the bread crumbs, Parmesan, OO and chives. Pour the mix over the pasta and veggies.
(Note: The dish can be prepared to this point, covered, and
refrigerated for up to 8 hours.)
Bake the gratin at 400 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes {mine took about 22 minutes} until nice and brown. Serve immediately

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This was very very good. But it was also very very very dry. I went back to the recipe to see if I had left something out, but I followed it correctly. The crumbs on top did not stay well on the dish, but were good mixed in. I will make this again, but it really needs some ‘juice’ of some kind. {Original recipe is on page 102 of Jacques Pepin’s Table.

The other Mystery Box dishes are probably delish. Check them out at I Heart Cooking Clubs.

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