Rice


This week’s theme for Wednesdays with Donna Hay is RICE! While here are lots of types of rice – white, brown, parboiled, wild (although it’s not really a rice), Arborio, even Black or Forbidden rice – we usually only use one or two of these regularly.  With all the rice choices it was not easy to find a recipe.

I finally settled on a rice pudding.  It was easy peasy since it used left over rice.  In my case, basmati.  The ramekins have 2 TBL of rice to which a simple custard is added.  Vanilla and cinnamon give it the flavor.

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20 minutes in the oven and you have a quick, comforting dessert.  And while it was still hot I sprinkled a little turbinado sugar over the top to melt.

I adapted this recipe for use in an Instant Pot.  The ramekins are  stacked in the pot and then cooked  on porridge for only 9 minutes.  I used quick release.

I have been a little intimidated by my new Instant Pot so haven’t used it much.  I’m trying to remedy that in small steps.

Donna’s recipe is on page 138 in new food fast

For more rice visit Rice is Nice on Wednesdays with Donna Hay.

I have never been a big veggie eater.  As a child I ate, and still do, cauliflower and broccoli which was strange for a small child.  Corn of course.  FROZEN peas. But other veggies – no thanks.

Over the years I have learned to eat and love raw spinach, okra, cabbage, squash, and lentils.  In fact lentils are now one of my favorite veggies.

My goal this year – try more and eat more veggies?  This lentil soup from Heidi fit right into that.  And since it’s pretty chilly outside it was the perfect lunch.

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Red Lentil Soup

 

    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    1 onion, chopped
    3 shallots, chopped
    1/2 teaspoon red-pepper flakes

    6 cups good-tasting vegetable stock (or water)
    1 1/3 cup red lentils, picked over and rinsed
    1/2 cup brown rice, picked over and rinsed
    as much fine grain sea salt as you need

    slivered almonds, toasted black oil cured olives, chopped feta, crumbled for toppings

In a large saucepan, over medium heat, brown onion, shallots, and red pepper flakes in the olive oil .

Add broth,  lentils, and rice and bring to a boil. Simmer  until the rice is very tender.The lentils will “dissolve”. You may need to add more water/broth to get the soup to the consistency that you want.  Salt to taste.

Serve each bowl topped with almonds, olives, feta, and a slight drizzle of olive oil if you like.

I made 1/2 of the recipe (three nice servings).  Even with salt I found it to be a little bland so I added 1 1/2 tsp of curry powder.  That added a really nice flavor and a little heat.  I topped it with yogurt because that is used quite a bit in Indian cuisine.  The yogurt added a little thickening and enhanced the flavor even more. LOVED IT!!  I will definitely make this again.  Definitely!

You can find her recipe at 101 Cookbooks

Want more Heidi.  Visit IHCC for this week’s Food Goals.

I had one more recipe of Curtis’s I really wanted to try but never got the chance while he was out ‘assigned’ chef for I Heart Cooking Clubs.

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asparagus and parmesan risotto

Y’all know how much I love risotto so I couldn’t pass this one up.  Seems like every time I went to make it I didn’t have one of the ingredients.  THIS time every thing came together.  YUM!

About 8 cups store-bought vegetable stock
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 shallots, finely diced

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 Tble dried thyme leaves {I didn’t have any fresh}
2 cups Arborio rice
3/4 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 pounds thin asparagus, woody ends removed, stalks cut into 1 1/2-inch lengths
4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter, cut in small pieces
1/2 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
1/4 cup mascarpone cheese
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1/4 cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves

Juice of 1/2 lemon

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, shaved with a vegetable peeler, for garnish
Bring the vegetable stock to a simmer in the mircowave and keep warm.
Heat the oil in a large heavy saucepan over medium heat and  sauté shallots, garlic, and thyme leaves until the shallots are tender but not browned. Add the rice and sauté just long enough to  coat with the oil.Add the wine and cook for 3 minutes,or until it is absorbed.

Add the hot veggie stock 3/4 cup at a time stirring after each addition until all the liquid has been absorbed and the rise is al dente
 

Add the asparagus cook for 2 more minutes.  Remove the pan  from the heat.  Add the butter, grated Parmigiano-Reggiano, and mascarpone cheese and stir until the butter has melted and the cheeses are just incorporated. Add the parsley, mint, and lemon.juice.  season the risotto generously with salt and pepper.

Garnish with the shaved Parmigiano-Reggiano, and serve.
Curtis’s risotto was a beautiful white with the green asparagus shining through.  My veggie stock was really dark so the risotto is very dark.  But it was full of flavor.  The  mascarpone, which I would NEVER have thought of using, added a certain sweetness to the risotto.  And the big shavings of Parmigiano-Reggiano….  nuff said!   I think I could live off of this risotto.
The recipe is from Relaxed Cooking with Curtis Stone.  Page 133}  You can find the original recipe his website as well.
Want more POTLUCK?  Visit IHCC.

 

 

This week’s theme – Rice is Nice – chosen by ME wasn’t as easy as I thought it would be.  I mean, rice, people.  It’s used in all kinds of dishes.  Desserts.  Salads. Sides.  Casseroles.  Why was it so hard to find a rice dish?  Because Ellie has plenty of them.

I thought about a nice rice pudding but I wasn’t in the mood for sweet.  I had just made a salad made with rice .  Then I ran across this risotto recipe.  I love making risotto.  It is such a comfort food.  Rich. Creamy.  Full of flavor.

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and since we had just harvested some butternut squash from the garden it was easy to decide.

Arborio rice, white wine, butternut squash, sage leaves, Parm cheese all came together in a love creamy dish.

Ellie called for 1 cup pureed butternut squash so I roasted the squash, cooled it, and pureed it in the blender.  I added a hint of salt to bring out the flavor in the squash.  I also needed a tad more broth for the risotto to be as creamy as I like.  The recipe called for 5 cups, I used 5 1/2.

This was tasty.  The FRESH butternut took the dish just over the top in flavor.

The recipe is from Ellie’s Comfort Food Fix (page 216).  I also found it HERE.

Kayte picked this week’s theme for Eating with Ellie – Soup and Salad.  Really, we could make one or the other or both.  It’s still pretty warm in Louisiana these days so I went with salad.

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This is a rice salad mixed with pistachios, orange slices, and basil.  the dressing is made from red wine vinegar, mustard, orange juice, honey and EVOO.

I liked the mix of wild rice and brown rice with the nuts and fruit but I didn’t care much for the dressing.  The rice mix  added a nice ‘tooth feel’ to the salad. I will make it again – but with a different dressing.

I like that Ellie made me think, at least for me, outside of my regular salad ‘box’.

The recipe is from Ellie’s The Food You Crave (page 147) but is also on FoodTV.

There are more soups and/or salads at Eating With Ellie.

This weeks theme for I Heart Cooking Clubs was “Finishing Touches” which really left what we could chose wide open. Anything that was drizzled, powdered, sprinkled, or topped with something to add just that right touch to a dish. I wanted something simple and this recipe caught my eye because the last instruction in the recipe was,

 GARNISH WITH THE TOASTED COCONUT!” 

Just the words I wanted to see.

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  • 1 cup Basmati rice
    1 1/4 cups chicken stock
    1 cup unsweetened coconut milk
    ½ tsp salt
    lightly toasted coconut for garnish

Combine the stock, coconut milk, and salt in a large heavy saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low. Add the rice and stir constantly for 1 minute. Cover the pan and simmer over low heat, without stirring, for 15 minutes or until the rice is almost tender and most of the liquid has been absorbed.
Remove from the heat and stand covered for 10 minutes, or until the rice is tender and all of the liquid has been absorbed. Lightly fluff up the rice with a fork. Transfer the rice to bowls and garnish with the toasted coconut and serve.

This, as Curtis says, is a perfect side for any Asian dish.  Since it is mild in flavor it would only enhance whatever it is served with.  The rice is creamy with a touch of sweetness from the coconut and coconut milk.

The recipe is from  Relaxed Cooking with Curtis Stone  on page 220.

For more garnishing;, sprinkling, powdering check with I Heart Cooking Clubs – Finishing Touches.

IT’s potluck week at I Heart Cooking Clubs.  That means we can cook from any chef that the group has used in the past.  This month I chose Yotam Ottolenghi because I haven’t cooked with him very much.  He was the chef back in 2013.  At that time I didn’t have any of his cookbooks.  Now, however, is a different story.  I have PLENTY, on my Kindle, and I am really taking a good look at his recipes.

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I chose the Lemon and Eggplant Risotto because this eggplant was begging to be used and I was lusting after some good risotto.

This is not a quick dish to make so don’t start it when you start the rest of your meal.  Start it before.  There are several steps you have to take before you actually start the risotto.

  1. ‘Burn’ an eggplant and then scoop out the pulp.
  2. Dice an eggplant and brown it until it is crispy.
  3. Sautee some onion and garlic.

After the onion and garlic are done then you can add in the wine, rice, and start making the risotto.  But let me tell you, it is worth every step and every dirty pan in the sink.  The sweetness of the eggplant mixed with the tart of the lemon zest and the semi sweetness of the basil is very mouth satisfying.  VERY!!!

Since I don’t have the book I cannot give you a page number in PLENTY, but I found it on The Hungry Goddess.

Visit with IHCC to see what else is on the Potluck table this week.

There is just something about risotto. It’s not easy to make. Well, it’s easy, it just takes a while. All the stirring and adding broth and stirring. But with the right combination of flavors it is well worth the effort. And this risotto was well worth the effort.

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This is Julie Shafer’s Risotto with Lemon and Asparagus

Julie says she learned to make risotto as a small girl cooking with her mother, grandmother, and aunts.  While we think of risotto as something fancy, she says it is just a staple of Italian cooking.  She also suggests that this is just a basic recipe and any local, seasonal veggie can be used.

    2 lemons
    2 small bundles asparagus
    1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
    2 tsp unsalted butter
    2 Tbl olive oil
    2 cups Arboio or Carnaroli rice
    2 – 3 quarts homemade or low-sodium store bought chicken broth, heated.

Zest the lemons then juice them and strain the juice.

Prepare the asparagus by peeling {which I did not do} and cutting off the tough ends.  Cut into 1″ pieces and steam to crisp.  {I am not a fan of steamed asparagus so I sauteed mine lightly in a little butter until just done.}

Sautee the onion in butter and olive oil over medium heat in a large skillet.  The onions should be fragrant and transparent.  Add in the rice and stir until the rice is well coated.  Season with salt and pepper.  {Salt and pepper are NOT in the recipe so I seasoned lightly and then later seasoned to taste.} Cook until the grains are almost clear.

Add the hot broth in to the rice/onion mix one ladle at at time and stir until it is absorbed. Continue this process until the rice is ALMOST creamy.

Add in the lemon juice, zest, steamed asparagus and one last addition of broth.  Cook for one additional minute.

Remove from the heat and add in the Parmesan to taste.  Add additional Salt and Pepper if needed. Let sit, covered, for about 5 minutes then serve.

Garnish with shaved Parmesan (optional)

This was really good.  I think I would use a little less lemon juice next time because I think it tended to overpower the asparagus.  You many not need a full 3 quarts of the broth.  I made 1/2 of the recipe and did not used a full 4 cups.

This is definitely a repeat.  I can imagine how it good it will be with different mushrooms, or maybe some spinach, or even just different cheeses.  It is very adaptable.

The recipe is on page 639 of O’Niel’s One Big Table,  an eclectic  collection of recipes from home cooks around the United States.

I’m linking this post with Cookbook Countdown hosted by Kitchen Flavours and Emily’s Cooking (Makan2).

One Big Table is full of what you could call every day recipes.  Favorite or ethnic dishes from everyday people around the United States. Many of the recipes I have marked are “out of the box’ for me but many are different variations of dishes I already make.  Like this one from Lonnie Holley in Harpersville, AL.  Lonnie is an artist whose work has been exhibited in several famous galleries or museums.  He says Jambalaya is a good thing to think about if you need to feed lots of people.  You can always add more rice.

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2 tablespoons sweet paprika
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon dried thyme
1 pound medium shrimp, peeled and deveined, shells reserved
4 whole chicken legs, cut apart to make drumsticks and thighs
4 tablespoons vegetable oil or bacon fat
1 quart water
1 yellow onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 red bell pepper, chopped
2 celery ribs, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1 large tomato, seeded and chopped
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons hot sauce (preferably Tabasco) {I used Crystal Hot Sauce}
2 cups white rice
6 cups homemade chicken broth or low-sodium. store-bought chicken broth .
4 Andouille sausages (about 1 pound), sliced in 1/4 inch chunks
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Combine the spices in a jar and mix well. Use 1 tablespoon of this spice blend in a big bowl to season the shrimp and chicken. (The remainder can be stored, tightly covered, in the refrigerator for up to 6 months.) {I made 1/2 the amount and used all of it.}
Cover and chill for an hour or two.
Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large pot over high heat. Add the shrimp shells and cook, stirring constantly, until the shells are bright pink. Add the water, bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and cook until the water is reduced to half, about 15 minutes. Strain the broth and set aside. {I didn’t do this and just used all chicken broth instead. If you can find Seafood Broth, use that.}
Warm 2 tablespoons of the oil in a dutch oven over medium heat.  Remove the chicken and shrimp from the refrigerator. Brown the chicken on all sides.
Add the onion, stir, and cook for 1 minute. Add the garlic, bell pepper, and celery, one by one and stir after each addition. Sautee for about 5 minutes or until the veggies are soft. Add the tomato, bay leaves, Worcestershire, and hot sauce. Add the rice and stir. Add 2·cups of the strained shrimp broth, if using, and the chicken broth to the rice. {If you are using just chicken broth use 6 cups.} Reduce the heat to medium-low, partially cover the pot, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes.
Add the shrimp and sausage, salt, pepper, and the left over spice blend to taste. Cook, uncovered, about 5 minutes more, until the rice is tender.
Remove from the heat and serve immediately. (Recipe adapted)
While this was a little spicier than I expected even tho’ I decreased the amount of Cayenne to 1/4 of what was called for, it was quite tasty. I love the mix of chicken, shrimp, and sausage in the Jambalaya. Definitely a keeper.
This recipe is on page 626 of One Big Table.

I’m linking this post with Cookbook Countdown hosted by Kitchen Flavours and Emily’s Cooking (Makan2).

It’s a new month which means using anew cookbook for a month.  One that I don’t cook from often enough.  Last month I used Deb Perelman’s Smitten Kitchen . This month I am going a different route.  A MAGAZINE!   Now, wait!  I cleared it first with Joyce.  She said she considered cooking magazines as mini cookbooks.  Done!!  I’ve got my next ‘book’.

Here in Louisiana we have stupendous cuisine.  African.  Native American. French. German. British. Spanish.  This is a state that has had many ‘rulers’ over the years and each one added their spin to the cuisine.

North Louisiana food is different from South Louisiana. The Prairies serve different food from the Coastal areas.  And Central Louisiana, where I live, is a mish/mash of all of it. Lucky us!

I didn’t grow up in Louisiana even though I was born here so I never really learned to cook ‘our’ dishes.  But now, I am learning.  So I subscribe to a mag called Louisiana  Cookin‘ which also has a web site with some of the RECIPES  I will be sending out this month.  You really need to check them out.

Ready for some Louisiana Cuisine?

How about

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Chicken, Andouille, and Shrimp Jambalaya?

Jambalaya is a Louisiana Creole dish that is basically Spanish and French.  It is, but it isn’t a chicken and rice dish.  It is similar to a Paella.  Actually it IS paella but the Spanish in New Orleans couldn’t locate some of their familiar ingredients so they adapted.   It usually contains the “holy trinity” in Creole and Cajun cooking: onion, celery, and green bell pepper.  There is also usually chicken, and sausage of some sort, often a smoked sausage such as Andouille. Some other meat or seafood, frequently pork, crawfish, or shrimp is also included.

The Atakapa Indians are responsible for the name.  The original word “Sham, pal ha! Ya!” means “Be full, not skinny! Eat Up!”. Spanish influence resulted in the current spelling of the name

The recipe is on the Louisiana Cookin’ website so I won’t include it here. But the ingredients include:

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 pound andouille sausage, sliced

2 pounds boneless-skinless chicken thighs, cut in 1-inch cubes

1½ cups chopped onion

1½ cups chopped celery

1½ cups chopped green bell pepper

3 cloves garlic, minced

3 cups long-grain rice

1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes

5 cups chicken broth

2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme

2 fresh bay leaves

1½ pounds large fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined

2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided

1 teaspoon ground black pepper, divided

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Garnish: chopped green onion

You really need to make this.  Really!  It is a wonderful example of Louisiana Cookin’!

The recipe is from the September/October issue.  Page 46

I’m linking this post with Cookbook Countdown hosted by Kitchen Flavours and Emily’s Cooking (Makan2) Foray.

cookbookcountdown

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